Wild Birds

Wild Bird Seed Cones

$23.50

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Just like it is natural namesake this cone looks perfect hanging from a tree. It is not just for looks however – our carefully crafted seed cone will attract birds from far and wide. 

Our premium New Zealand-grown seeds are high in energy and rich in essential nutrients, providing a boost for wild birds when food is scarce. When these highly nutritious seeds are sculpted into an easy-use seed treat you will find the local birds will soon find their way to your place.

  • Perfect for colder months when food is scarce.
  • Easy to hang.
  • Your Seed Cone can attract finches, pigeons, rosella and more…
  • Set it up high off the ground to avoid predators.

Feeding guide

Protect your bird buddies from anything that might pounce while they peck! Place your see cone well off the ground to keep birds safe from predators. It may take some time for the birds to recognise the new food so do not be discouraged if they do not turn up straight away. Be sure to replenish food regularly during autumn and winter also because that is when they’ll need it most.

Ingredients

Wheat, sorghum, canary seed, oats, barley, panicum, radish, weedseed, oilseed rape, NZ sunflower.

Analysis

Protein 15.2%, Fibre 10.3%, Fat 16.6%

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